Southwind Arrives!

Anderson Viewpoint during a winter storm!

Anderson Viewpoint during a winter storm!

SEASON’S GREETINGS FROM THE TILLAMOOK COAST!

This is the time of year when our tour operations tend to slow down, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t loads to do in the local off season!  One of the more popular coastal activities during the rainy season is taking a view at our region’s epic storm fronts as they collide with the North American Continent.  The Tillamook area is subject to a seasonal beating in the form of torrential rains, hurricane force winds, mountaintop snowfalls and our famous consecutive “hundred-year” floods.

The Nehalem River in 1996 - Image courtesy of Neahkahnie Visions

The Nehalem River in 1996 – Image courtesy of Neahkahnie Visions

This seasonal inundation had been around for quite some time.  I remember back in 1996 watching our rivers breach their dykes and cause the first in living memory of what was then called a freak “100 year flood.”  Then I watched it happen in ’97, then again in ’98.  Also too in ’99, then we got a reprieve until 2002.  For a while it was good but then something truly epic happened at the latter end of 2007.  In what us locals describe as a perfect storm, in December 2007 our area received what was classified per it’s wind speed; as a type 2 hurricane.   It was the Pineapple Express coming in straight from Hawaii.  Even when you look at the satellite footage back then you’d see a straight line of storm coming directly from the Hawaiian Islands.

An approximation of what a Tillamook native village looked like.  -Image courtesy of Whitewolve.com

An approximation of what a Tillamook native village looked like. -Image courtesy of Whitewolve.com

Though this was the first I’d ever seen something like that I now remind myself that there is precedent history in the anecdotal form.  The native tribes of the Tillamook area associated the these winter storms with one of their most powerful deities, his name was Southwind.  Southwind was characterized as a young man full of buffoonery.  He would constantly get into questionable situations which would result invariably in some sort of accident, this was a proverbial manifestation of the physical change these large storms exact upon the north Oregon Coast.  The affect of his relative buffoonery can be seen in our flooding, landslides, wind damage and everything else that these storms tend to dish out annually.  This Coast Salish God still trounces our region to this day.  We locals are used to it.

 

Look for more about the Tillamook area in the future and of course think of Tillamook Eco Adventures next time you visit our beautiful and bountiful County!

Season’s Greetings from Tillamook Eco Adventures!

Eco-2 in a cold freeze!

Eco-2 in a cold freeze!

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